Author Archives: Megan L.

About Megan L.

Megan graduated from Boston University in 2008 with an M.A. in Historical Archaeology. While in graduate school, she wrote her master's thesis on 18th-century glass drinkingware excavated during the Big Dig and interned with NMSC for 2 years. Megan has been a full-time employee since February 2010.

Tea Trivia

Today is the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party (December 16, 1773). In honor of this famous (or infamous, depending on who you ask) event, here’s some tea trivia to brighten up your Friday: The earliest known English advertisement for … Continue reading

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Enemies of the Curator: Glass Deterioration

When people see iridescence on glass, they almost always ask: “Is this decoration?” The answer is no. It is actually a sign that the glass is slowly dying, its surface deteriorating as the chemicals in the glass react to the … Continue reading

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Business Cards with Personality – Inexpensive ways to reach your community

In today’s highly technical world, engagement is easier than ever, if you can get your audience’s attention. With limited resources, this often proves challenging for museum professionals. Business Cards with Personality: A Case Study National Park Service archeology collections have huge research … Continue reading

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Cataloging 101: Lead Glazed Redware vs. Jackfield

Following last week’s post, There’s Jackfield Afoot, I received the following question: How do you tell the difference between lead glazed redware and Jackfield? Since I asked this question when I was learning to catalog, I thought others may be … Continue reading

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Oval Bottle Identification

Can you help us to learn more about this oval-based “bastard” bottles? We’ve recently contacted the Histarch Listserv and received some great feedback, but we are hoping to learn even more about this unique bottle. Have you come across oval bottles … Continue reading

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There’s Jackfield Afoot: Tracing Patterns of Consumption through an 18th Century Teapot

  When thinking about archeology, it’s easy to assume that the most exciting discoveries are made in ‘the field’ and the lab is only used for housekeeping activities. Oftentimes, though, the lab is where the most exciting discoveries are made because it is here … Continue reading

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Skulls, Cherubs, and Willows, Oh My! – Interpreting 17th, 18th, & 19th Century Gravestones

Halloween is the perfect time to visit a graveyard, and the older the better. We admire old gravestones for their artistic qualities and respect them as reminders of our own mortality. But did you know that gravestone fashions evolved over … Continue reading

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Ask a Curator: Victorian Brass Weight

This week’s Ask a Curator object doesn’t have a definitive answer, but it’s a great example of the process behind cataloging an object. When we came across this artifact, we had a little help. It had already been conserved and … Continue reading

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Cataloging 101: A quick way to identify earthenware ceramics

Can you spot the creamware in this picture? And no, it’s not a trick question. If you guessed the cream-colored sherd in the middle, you are correct. When you know what you are looking for, differentiating between creamware, pearlware, and whiteware … Continue reading

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The Prehistory of Minute Man National Historical Park

Minute Man National Historical Park is perhaps best known for its role in the American Revolution. Visitors to this park are greeted by colonial homes, the capture site of Paul Revere, and the site of the famous “shot heard round … Continue reading

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